Sunday, August 13, 2017

Password ruling should be reconsidered

Password used to protect your internet account is one of the most annoying systems in recent years. Perhaps you have to manage several different passwords in each online service, internet banking, and webmail. In some website, you are encouraged to change the password regularly. Also, you are requested to include some capital letters and non-alphabet symbols.


These rules are considered to be a standard for a safe password. But it was established by Bill Burr in 2003. And now, he regrets these statements.

The Wall Street Journal: The Man Who Wrote Those Password Rules Has a New Tip: N3v$r M1^d!

In real, the longer, the better, to protect your password. On the other hand, when you set a complex password which is requested to be amended frequently, you will hesitate to be serious to adhere to the regulation. Instead, you will make a simple rule for regular change of your password, such as Pa55word1 to Pa55w0rd2. Obviously, this sequence is very vulnerable to crackers.

Recent findings suggest that you should change password only when you feel unsafe. I completely agree with this idea. We often forget the password and demand the service to reset it. The more we request the reset, the more risk of cracking increased. Rather, making the password remembered by Google Chrome or other reliable service providers seems to be safer.

Even now, some service providers demand me to change the password very frequently. Annoying!

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